North America

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Regions

North America consists of three large nations and one large island territory that covers most of its area. They are Canada, the United States of America (USA), Mexico and Greenland. There are also seven smaller nations at its southern extreme (collectively known as Central America), around two dozen island nations and territories of various sizes in the Caribbean, and one isolated French territory off the Canadian Atlantic coast. Although the Central American and the Caribbean regions are technically part of the North American continent, they are commonly listed separately from their larger neighbors to the north and hence the distinctive region names for both cultural and geographical reasons.

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Canada
The Great White North certainly has vast expanses of unspoiled wilderness, but it also features some of the world's most modern, cosmopolitan cities.
Caribbean
White sandy beaches, crystal-clear water, and laid-back island culture make the Caribbean one of the world's top vacation spots.
Central America
The seven nations of this isthmus connecting North and South America blend elements of both American continents; you'll find bustling cities, ancient jungle ruins, and a Spanish-tinged culture.
Greenland
A self-governing country, but still part of Denmark, Greenland is a vast island of stark landscapes and midnight sun.
Mexico
Mexico is a big tourist attraction for sun-seekers, naturalists/ecotourists and historians alike; the first flock to Mexico's tropical beaches, while the latter will find everything from Mayan ruins to Spanish colonial history.
United States of America
One of the largest, most ethnically diverse and multicultural nations on Earth includes some of the world's most famous cities, natural parks of unspeakable beauty, and virtually everything in between.

Non-Caribbean territories